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Bookstore / Roundup

Daley Farr – 11/11/2018

This month’s recommendations from our bookstore staff feature foldout folktale monsters, reflections on freeing ourselves from legacies of harm, lovingly-told tales from the basketball court, and unusual, textured stories of women and mystery. Each of these books is uniquely suited to be revisited—all four are made up of stories, histories, and ideas that merit our returning to them over and over again, to lending them out to friends and family, to unpeeling a new layer with every re-read. We like to think that makes these titles a good fit for this season, when we find ourselves caught between bustle and hibernation. 

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Authors / Watch & Listen

Milkweed Staff – 11/08/2018

Just released in the latest issue of Emergence Magazine is a new essay by Robin Wall Kimmerer, complete with an interactive experience including audio, parallax illustration, the most cosmological photos of corn you will possibly ever see in your life, stop motion animation with folded paper corn, and an interactive timeline.

Awards & Prizes

Milkweed Staff – 11/05/2018

For his manuscript The Milk Hours, chosen by acclaimed poet and judge Henri Cole, James will receive $10,000 and publication by Milkweed Editions in June 2019.

Authors / Bookstore / Roundup

Bao Phi – 11/01/2018

Welcome to our Book Bundle series! Authors we love choose three of their favorite titles, we bundle them up nicely, and your to-be-read pile flourishes. This round of recommended reading comes from esteemed Twin Cities poet Bao Phi, author of collections Sông I Sing and Thousand Star Hotel, as well as A Different Pond, a Caldecott Honor Award book for children illustrated by Thi Bui. See what Bao has to say about these three books he loves! 

Murder on the Red River
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Bookstore / Roundup

Daley Farr – 10/09/2018

We are feeling the Halloween spirit here at Milkweed Books (have you seen our Trick or Treat display?), so to celebrate, here is a 💥 bonus round 💥 of book recommendations featuring the dark and scary stuff we think you might like to read this month. Whether you’re feeling like historical Midwestern gothic, a wacky German war satire, or haunting Urdu short stories, we have something for you to try. If you prefer to read something sweet rather than scary this season, we’ve also included a few gentler literary treats. Don’t worry, our devotion to spooky literature isn’t merely seasonal—you...

Bookstore / Roundup

Amy Thielen – 10/09/2018

Authors we love choose three of their favorite titles, we bundle them up nicely, your to-be-read pile flourishes. This week’s recommended reading comes from Minnesotan extraordinaire Amy Thielen. See what she has to say about these three books she loves! 

Bookstore / Roundup

Daley Farr – 10/09/2018

This month’s recommendations from our bookstore staff feature the feel-good power of food, hot chilies to eat and admire, a mist-shrouded casino, and essays on all things monstrous. 

Authors

Sarah Ruhl – 09/17/2018

Max Ritvo began as my student. I met Max when he was a senior at Yale. This is how he began his application to get into my playwriting workshop: Dear Professor Ruhl, Thanks for reading this application. My name is Max Ritvo—I’m a senior English major in the Creative Writing Concentration. All I want to do is write. His application said that he was a poet and a comedian, part of an experimental comedy troupe. A poet and he’s funny? Huh. I reread his application, which had been left to stew in the “no” pile because he’d never written a play before. And because funny poets are a rare and wonderful species of human being, I moved Max to the “yes” pile, despite his lack of experience writing plays. It is hard to imagine now that Max’s application could ever have remained in any other pile—a strange parallel universe in which I never met Max.

Bookstore / Roundup

Daley Farr – 09/17/2018

This week marks two years since we opened Milkweed Books, our independent bookstore in the Open Book building. Here are this month's recommendations, in which four real people suggest good books we think you might like, too!

Authors

Louise Glück – 09/17/2018

Max Ritvo was a prodigiously gifted poet; toward the end of his life, he was also volcanically productive. Nothing he wrote was without flashes of brilliance, but many of these late poems would surely have been revised or jettisoned; it was slow work to sift out the very best. This he asked me to do—it seemed to me an essential labor lest the weaker poems dilute the stronger. What follows, obviously, reflects my judgment. Nothing has been revised; Elizabeth Metzger, Max’s designated literary executor, suggested one minute cut. Cancer was Max’s tragedy; it was also, as he was canny enough to see, his opportunity. Poets who die at twenty-five do not commonly leave bodies of work so urgent, so daring, so supple, so desperately alive.

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