An American Child Supreme: The Education of a Liberal Ecologist
Nonfiction
The Education of a Liberation Ecologist
By 
John Nichols

The author was happily sailing through life, raised among naturalists and nurtured by a family history as American as the Stars and Stripes. But then a short trip to Guatemala changed his life, setting him on a very different path toward radical social and environmental commitment.

Nonfiction
The Grace of the Wild
By 
Paul Gruchow

Organized by the seasons of the year, this book explores the natural and soul-sustaining beauty of the largest roadless area east of the Rocky Mountains. Drawing on the works of Thoreau and Wendell Berry, the author turns his naturalist’s eye on this wilderness full of wolves, moose, and loons.

Nonfiction
By 
Bill Holm

Growing up, the author could define failure easily; it was “to die in Minneota.” But when he returned to his hometown twenty years later, he began to discover more of himself and of our time. This books investigates—through the lens of small-town life—what community means and the rigid definitions we give to “success” and “failure.”

Nonfiction
By 
Joseph Bruchac

This colorful memoir traces the author’s path from “nature nut” to jock to writer, to his home at the end of Ridge Road near where he was raised by his grandparents. Just as essentially, it explores the links between his native Abenaki culture and long-held views on human dignity and social justice.

Atlas
Poetry
By 
Katrina Vandenberg

These poems capture the way events reverberate and repeat across time and place: between the seventeenth-century tulip trade and the twentieth-century AIDS epidemic, for example; or even between a housekeeper, a Vermeer painting, and that day’s episode of Oprah. Like any good atlas, this collection plots intersections: of love, death, history, art, and desire.

Poetry
By 
Jean Nordhaus

Under Frederick the Great, every Jew who married was required to buy otherwise unsalable china from the royal porcelain factory. Moses Mendelssohn, a world-famous philosopher in the eighteenth century, was forced to buy twenty life-size porcelain apes. These poems take the reader on a journey through Mendelssohn’s life.

Young Readers
By 
John Armistead

The summer of 1964 begins calmly enough. But when civil rights workers come to a small Mississippi town and the Ku Klux Klan responds with intimidation and terrorism, the sultry days and nights are transformed into Freedom Summer. Soon three friends, confronted with decisions well beyond their years, will have to grapple with the nature of heroism.

Young Readers
A Novel
By 
Natasha Friend

Isabelle Lee is a typical, wisecracking, middle-of-the-pack girl who just happens to be dealing with some big issues. Her father has died and no one—especially her mother—wants to talk about it. Meanwhile, Isabelle’s sister has messed everything up by ratting Isabelle out to their mom about her eating disorder.

Fiction
By 
Susan Power

These stories evoke a world in which spirits and the living commingle and Sioux culture and modern life collide with disarming power, humor, and joy. The characters grapple with potent forces of family, history, and belief—forces that at times dare them to do more to feed their identity, and at times simply paralyze them.

Young Readers
A Story of Finnish Immigrants
By 
Isabel Marvin

Thirteen-year-old Anna Kallio often thinks about the way life was before her mother died. When Anna and her brother realize how lonely their father is, they plot to find him a new wife, even trying to arrange a match with one of the “mail order” brides arriving from Finland. But the results are different from anything that Anna expected.

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