Grass Roots: The Universe of Home
Nonfiction
The Universe of Home
By 
Paul Gruchow
Winner of the Minnesota Book Award

These eloquent essays meditate on living with the land and reinvigorating the values of community. Combining personal reflection and memoir with a powerful look at the state of our rural towns and people, this collection postulates a society in which our lives are more than commodities and our land is more than an extension of our industries.

Poetry
Women of Japan Relive the Bomb
By 
Lequita Vance-Watkins and Aratani Mariko

In this anthology, women survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki write of the attack’s cause, effects, and aftermath. In potent prose and poetry, these women bear witness to the shared responsibility for bringing about war, any war, their voices refuting the idea that the devastation unleashed ended when the war did.

An American Brat
Fiction
By 
Bapsi Sidhwa

Growing up in Pakistan in the 1970s, Feroza Ginwalla is precocious, impetuous, and increasingly affected by the rising tide of religious fundamentalism there. When her family decides to send her to America for a change of scenery and influence, a chain of amusing events and encounters ensues.

Nonfiction
By 
Annick Smith

In 1964 the author came to Montana with her husband and their boys. In a fertile valley where meadows tip downward toward the Big Blackfoot River, they found what they had dreamed of: 163 acres of ranchland with a view of a creek, hills, and the Rattlesnake Mountains.

Annick Smith is the author of several books, including Homestead, In This We Are Native, Big Bluestem, and most recently Crossing the Plains with Bruno. She is also the editor of Headwaters: Montana Writers on Water & Wilderness, and coeditor with Susan O’Connor of The Wide Open: Prose, Poetry, and Photographs of the Prairie and, most recently, Hearth: A Global Conversation on Identity, Community, and Place. She lives in Bonner, Montana.

Nonfiction
Reading and Thinking about Ethics
By 
Carol Bly

Bosses, partners, governments, corporations—all can act as bullies, intimidating us to their will. But changing their behavior may be in our power. This provocative, visionary book examines some of this century’s most far-ranging concepts about how to nurture ethical human beings and presents them through the lens of contemporary literature.

Young Readers
By 
Aileen Kilgore Henderson

Page Williams is leaving behind her dad and the only home she’s ever known, heading for Texas and Big Bend National Park. Page is reluctant and angry—but when she is greeted by her new schoolmates, a mountain lion named Carmencita, and a family of skunks, she discovers there is much more to her new neighborhood than dry heat and rattlesnakes.

Fiction
By 
Tessa Bridal

Magda’s childhood in 1960s Uruguay is one of small pleasures. But as she grows up, her government increasingly turns on its own people in both subtle and overt acts of terror, and soon her family and friends come under threat. So after a year abroad, Magda makes a fateful decision: to join the underground struggle against the government.

The Dog with Golden Eyes
Young Readers
By 
Frances Wilbur

Cassie has always wanted a dog, more than anything in the world, but her mother has always refused. Then, one day, her dream cautiously sniffs its way into her yard and into her life. But quickly Cassie learns that Toklata, as she names her new friend, is a big responsibility—and that he may not be a sled dog at all but an Arctic wolf!

Nonfiction
By 
Alison Hawthorne Deming

In this book, the author describes locales that are dear to her because they are still shaped by nature: Grand Manan Island in the Bay of Fundy; Provincetown, Massachusetts; Tucson, Arizona; and Poamoho, Hawaii. The farther we remove ourselves from wild settings, she argues, the farther we are removed from our spiritual centers.

Pages

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