Young Readers
A Novel of the Segregated South
By 
John Armistead

It’s the summer of 1955, and teenagers George, Esther, and Bennett spend their time roaming the countryside together, fishing and searching for outlaw treasure. But when a current of racism ruptures their idyllic summer, the three friends are forced to confront the hate that surrounds them.

Nonfiction
The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepard
By 
Mary Rose O'Reilley

Deciding that her life was insufficiently grounded in real-world experience, the author, a Quaker reared as a Catholic, embarked on a year of tending sheep. In this often hilarious book, she describes her time in the barn as well as an extended visit to a Buddhist monastery in France.

Arctic Refuge: A Circle of Testimony
Nonfiction
A Circle of Testimony
By 
Hank Lentfer and Carolyn Servid

In January 2001, the editors, responding to proposals to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, sent a call to writers across the country. With testimonies by President Jimmy Carter, Wendell Berry, Barry Lopez, Bill McKibben, and Terry Tempest Williams, this is an ideal introduction to the Refuge and issues surrounding our use of energy and public lands.

An American Child Supreme: The Education of a Liberal Ecologist
Nonfiction
The Education of a Liberation Ecologist
By 
John Nichols

The author was happily sailing through life, raised among naturalists and nurtured by a family history as American as the Stars and Stripes. But then a short trip to Guatemala changed his life, setting him on a very different path toward radical social and environmental commitment.

Nonfiction
The Grace of the Wild
By 
Paul Gruchow

Organized by the seasons of the year, this book explores the natural and soul-sustaining beauty of the largest roadless area east of the Rocky Mountains. Drawing on the works of Thoreau and Wendell Berry, the author turns his naturalist’s eye on this wilderness full of wolves, moose, and loons.

Nonfiction
By 
Bill Holm

Growing up, the author could define failure easily; it was “to die in Minneota.” But when he returned to his hometown twenty years later, he began to discover more of himself and of our time. This books investigates—through the lens of small-town life—what community means and the rigid definitions we give to “success” and “failure.”

Nonfiction
By 
Joseph Bruchac

This colorful memoir traces the author’s path from “nature nut” to jock to writer, to his home at the end of Ridge Road near where he was raised by his grandparents. Just as essentially, it explores the links between his native Abenaki culture and long-held views on human dignity and social justice.

Atlas
Poetry
By 
Katrina Vandenberg

These poems capture the way events reverberate and repeat across time and place: between the seventeenth-century tulip trade and the twentieth-century AIDS epidemic, for example; or even between a housekeeper, a Vermeer painting, and that day’s episode of Oprah. Like any good atlas, this collection plots intersections: of love, death, history, art, and desire.

Poetry
By 
Jean Nordhaus

Under Frederick the Great, every Jew who married was required to buy otherwise unsalable china from the royal porcelain factory. Moses Mendelssohn, a world-famous philosopher in the eighteenth century, was forced to buy twenty life-size porcelain apes. These poems take the reader on a journey through Mendelssohn’s life.

Young Readers
By 
John Armistead

The summer of 1964 begins calmly enough. But when civil rights workers come to a small Mississippi town and the Ku Klux Klan responds with intimidation and terrorism, the sultry days and nights are transformed into Freedom Summer. Soon three friends, confronted with decisions well beyond their years, will have to grapple with the nature of heroism.

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