Poetry
By 
Kathy Fagan

The language of trees is the language of love and loss: in this collection, black walnuts fall where no one can eat or smell them, and cottonwood sends out feverish signals of pollen. And like the bark of the sycamore, which sheds to allow the tree’s expansion, these poems document both pain and tenuous rebirth.

Kathy Fagan

Kathy Fagan is the author of Sycamore, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award, as well as four previous collections including The Charm, the National Poetry Series-winning The Raft, and Vassar Miller Prize-winner MOVING & ST RAGE. A former NEA fellow, she is currently the Director of Creative Writing and the MFA program at Ohio State University, and Poetry Editor for OSU Press.

Tula
Poetry
By 
Chris Santiago

Tula: a ruined Toltec capital; a Russian city known for its accordions; Tagalog for “poem.” Inspired by the experiences of the second-generation immigrant who does not fully acquire the language of his parents, the winner of the 2016 Lindquist & Vennum Prize for Poetry paints the portrait of a mythic homeland that is part ghostly underworld, part unknowable paradise.

Poetry
By 
Christopher Howell
Finalist for the UNT Rilke Prize

At once profoundly intimate and ambitiously broad in scope, this collection explores the place of individual losses and joys in the context of greater historical tragedy and triumph. In a multiplicity of voices and tones, these poems reflect on what we do about memory, love, grief, war, and the contradictions implicit in the human search for meaning. 

Christopher Howell

Christopher Howell has published ten collections of poems, most recently Gaze and Love’s Last Number, which was a finalist for the UNT Rilke Prize. He teaches at Eastern Washington University, where he is also director of Willow Springs Books, as well as director and principal editor for Lynx House Press.

Cold Pastoral
Poetry
By 
Rebecca Dunham

Deepwater Horizon, Hurricane Katrina, Flint: this is the litany of our time, and these are the events traced in these poems, invoking the poet as moral witness. Incorporating interviews and excerpts from government documents and other sources, this collection reveals what poetry can—and, perhaps, should—be, reflecting ourselves and our world back with gorgeous clarity.

Rebecca Dunham

Rebecca Dunham is the author of Cold Pastoral and three previous collections of poems, including Glass Armonica, winner of the 2013 Lindquist & Vennum Prize for Poetry, and The Miniature Room, winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize.

What a Woman Must Do
Fiction
By 
Faith Sullivan

When Celia Canby and her husband are killed in a car accident, her aunt Kate and cousin Harriet are left to raise Celia's daughter. Ten years later, it’s the 1950s, and the three generations of women are being drawn apart by life, loss, and new love.

War on Science
Nonfiction
Who's Waging It, Why It Matters, What We Can Do About It
By 
Shawn Otto

At the very time we need them most, scientists and the idea of objective knowledge are being bombarded by a well-funded, three-part war on science. This provocative book investigates why and how, and offers compelling solutions to bring us to our collective senses, before it’s too late.

Into the Sun
Fiction
By 
Deni Ellis Béchard

When a car explodes in Kabul ten years after 9/11, a journalist discovers that its passengers—three fellow ex-pats—had formed an unlikely love triangle. As the journalist learns more, the narratives of their lives become inseparable from the story of America’s imperial misadventures.

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