Lauret Savoy

A teacher, earth scientist, writer, photographer, and pilot, Lauret Savoy is author of Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape (Counterpoint Press), a finalist for the 2016 PEN American Open Book Award and Phillis Wheatley Book Award, and the co-editor of several anthologies. She is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College.

American Boy
Fiction
By 
Larry Watson
An Esquire Best Book of 2011

Matthew Garth’s story begins in the fall of 1962, with the shooting of a young woman on Thanksgiving Day. Fueled over the following weeks by his longing for this mysterious woman, Matthew finds himself drawn into a series of confrontations he never expected, giving lie to his version of the American dream.

Blood of the Sun
Poetry
By 
Salgado Maranhão

In these poems, presented in both Portuguese and English, butcher shops, sex, and machine guns sit in spirited dialogue with language, absence, and time. The resulting collection is varied as well as unified, brilliantly textured and layered.

The Fact of the Matter
Poetry
By 
Sally Keith

This collection shows the self as a crucible of force—that which compels us to exert ourselves upon the world, and meanwhile renders us vulnerable to it. From Robert Smithson’s colossal Spiral Jetty to a train hurdling along the west-reaching railroad, these poems reimagine things great and small.

Fall of Alice K
Fiction
By 
Jim Heynen

On the surface, Alice Marie Krayenbraak has it all: she’s beautiful and witty, a star student and a gifted athlete. But nothing is as it seems: the family farm is failing, Alice’s mother awaits the apocalypse, her parents are planning to send her special-needs sister away—and Alice has just fallen in love.

Tarball Chronicles
Nonfiction
A Journey Beyond the Oiled Pelican and Into the Heart of the Gulf Oil Spill
By 
David Gessner
Winner of the Phillip D. Reed Memorial Award for Outstanding Writing on the Southern Environment

After the Deepwater Horizon well was capped in 2010, most reporters and government officials turned away from the unfolding narrative: the story was over. But for one writer the unimaginable amount of oil spilled into the ocean was only the beginning—initiating a journey into the heart of Gulf country and an exploration of the wildlife and humans who call it home.

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