Fiction
By 
Dalia Rosenfeld

The characters of these stories are animated by forces at once passionate and perplexing. Fiercely funny and entirely original, this collection takes readers from the United States to Israel and back again to examine the mystifying reaches of our own minds and hearts.  

Dalia Rosenfeld is the author of The Worlds We Think We Know, a collection of short stories. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, her work has appeared in publications including the Atlantic, AGNI, Michigan Quarterly ReviewMississippi Review, and Colorado Review. She teaches writing at Bar Ilan University and lives with her three children in Tel Aviv.

Sheila Fischman has translated more than 150 Quebecois novels from French to English, including Larry Tremblay’s The Orange Grove. She has received numerous awards for her work, including the Governor General’s Literary Award for Translation, the Columbia University Translation Center Award (twice), and, most recently, the Canada Council for the Arts Molson Prize. 

The Freedom of History
Poetry
By 
Jim Moore
Winner of the Minnesota Book Award

This collection is an exploration of histories, personal and public. The author says of these poems: “I am interested in the times when personal and political history liberate, and the times when they oppress.”

Poetry
By 
Margaret Hasse

These poems take a sometimes humorous, sometimes wrenching look at human relationships, at the varieties of isolation and communication possible in sexuality and friendship. This collection's lush lyric voice is grounded in a tough sensibility, an undaunted, sensuous truth-telling.

Nonfiction
The Role of Assent in Learning
By 
Herbert Kohl

This important essay is a penetrating look at our schools’ frequent failure to consider the values of their clients—our children and young adults.

Cracking India
Fiction
By 
Bapsi Sidhwa

As the young daughter of an affluent Parsee family in Lahore, Lenny is keenly observant of the city’s astonishing diversity—Muslims and Hindus, Christians and Sikhs, coexisting together. But as Lahore descends into sectarian violence, Lenny’s innocence is lost, and with it the fragile unity of a nation.

The Crow Eaters
Fiction
By 
Bapsi Sidhwa

Loading his pregnant wife, infant daughter, and widowed mother-in-law into a bullock cart, Faredoon Junglewalla—Freddy for short—leaves his ancestral village for the bustling city of Lahore. Despite the nagging of his unbearable mother-in-law, Freddy’s business and family flourish, and he soon becomes a patriarchal figure in the thriving Parsee community.

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